SELLER, John (1632-97) SELLER, John (1632-97)

ATLAS MINIMUS, OR A BOOK OF GEOGRAPHY SHEWING ALL THE EMPIRES, MONARCHIES KINGDOMES, REGIONS, DOMINIONS PRINCIPALITIES AND COUNTRIES IN THE WHOLE WORLD BY JOHN SELLER HYDROGRAPHER TO THE KING

London : And are Sold [by John Seller] at his House at the Hermitage in Wapping, and in Pope’s Head Alley in Cornhiill, 1679.

Pott 16mo (115 x 80 mm); engraved title [by James Clark], engraved licence leaf in favour of R. L’Estrang showing a small circular map of the...

London : And are Sold [by John Seller] at his House at the Hermitage in Wapping, and in Pope’s Head Alley in Cornhiill, 1679.

Pott 16mo (115 x 80 mm); engraved title [by James Clark], engraved licence leaf in favour of R. L’Estrang showing a small circular map of the...

£7,500.00
-
+
Add to wishlist

London : And are Sold [by John Seller] at his House at the Hermitage in Wapping, and in Pope’s Head Alley in Cornhiill, 1679.

Pott 16mo (115 x 80 mm); engraved title [by James Clark], engraved licence leaf in favour of R. L’Estrang showing a small circular map of the world; [49] single page engraved maps and a twin-hemispherical world map double-page titled “A Mapp of All the World” (strengthened with archive tissue); each of the single page maps is accompanied by a geographical table  identifying the major regions within each area and the notable towns and cities. The maps for Great Britain & Ireland, and France, have handwritten notes in the margin (barely legible), while those for Arabia, India within the Ganges, and the table for Barbaria, are soiled on the verso, while that for the Artick Pole (ie Greenland and Iceland) is slightly toned and a bit tatty at the edge; the Mogul Empire map is missing a small triangular piece at the foot near joint with the spine. This copy is lacking the map for Biledulgerit (the table is present) and seemingly the maps for Congo, Asiatick Islands, and Main India (when compared to the BL copy which also has 48 pages of text, the Asia map transposed to the left with the table on the right, the date of publication [1679] handwritten on the titlepage, and the map of Barbaria repeated). Bound in full sheep with remnants of gilt borders to sides, spine with three raised bands is cracked and relaid. Ex.libris Thomas Abbot with his name written in ink hand on the pastedown and dated 1832; indecipherable scrawling on the opposite endpaper, two endpapers in the back, none in the front. A solid, if somewhat battered, copy. (Wing S2465;)

While not the first world atlas published in England, the preceding atlases were either printed from continental printing plates (as with the folio Ortelius and Mercator-Hondius atlases, the quarto Mercator-Hondius Atlas minor or the pocket editions of Ortelius) or closely copied from continental models (Speed's Prospect and Blome's Geographical Description). This pocket-sized volume, “usefull for merchants and marriners” despite its diminutive size, is the first composed on an English model.
The atlas first appeared as the Book of Geography circa 1676, the maps designed as playing cards, each suit devoted to one of the continents; in this new edition the engraved annotations necessary for use as playing cards have been removed, changes have been made to the plates, and the volume recast as Atlas Minimus, or a Book of Geography, evidently as an educational volume, which seems to have been a more successful format. As with the example in the New York Public Library, but unlike the British Library copy, this copy was issued without text.
Thirteen of the maps relate to the Americas, including a map of North and South America, one of North America (The English Empire in America), New Mexico (the first English map to focus on New Mexico and the island of California), and Florida (the first English map of what is now the southern United States, from Florida to Texas). Also the Artick Pole is the term used to describe Greenland and Iceland, while Zaara is the archaic word used to identify the Sahara.
John Seller was an English instrument-maker, map-maker, chart-maker, publisher of the first sustained series of English maritime atlases, the instigator of a national survey of England and Wales, the publisher of our first celestial atlas, and writer on navigation and seller of maps, charts, and geographical books. From 1671 he held the position of Hydrographer to the King.

London : And are Sold [by John Seller] at his House at the Hermitage in Wapping, and in Pope’s Head Alley in Cornhiill, 1679.

Pott 16mo (115 x 80 mm); engraved title [by James Clark], engraved licence leaf in favour of R. L’Estrang showing a small circular map of the world; [49] single page engraved maps and a twin-hemispherical world map double-page titled “A Mapp of All the World” (strengthened with archive tissue); each of the single page maps is accompanied by a geographical table  identifying the major regions within each area and the notable towns and cities. The maps for Great Britain & Ireland, and France, have handwritten notes in the margin (barely legible), while those for Arabia, India within the Ganges, and the table for Barbaria, are soiled on the verso, while that for the Artick Pole (ie Greenland and Iceland) is slightly toned and a bit tatty at the edge; the Mogul Empire map is missing a small triangular piece at the foot near joint with the spine. This copy is lacking the map for Biledulgerit (the table is present) and seemingly the maps for Congo, Asiatick Islands, and Main India (when compared to the BL copy which also has 48 pages of text, the Asia map transposed to the left with the table on the right, the date of publication [1679] handwritten on the titlepage, and the map of Barbaria repeated). Bound in full sheep with remnants of gilt borders to sides, spine with three raised bands is cracked and relaid. Ex.libris Thomas Abbot with his name written in ink hand on the pastedown and dated 1832; indecipherable scrawling on the opposite endpaper, two endpapers in the back, none in the front. A solid, if somewhat battered, copy. (Wing S2465;)

While not the first world atlas published in England, the preceding atlases were either printed from continental printing plates (as with the folio Ortelius and Mercator-Hondius atlases, the quarto Mercator-Hondius Atlas minor or the pocket editions of Ortelius) or closely copied from continental models (Speed's Prospect and Blome's Geographical Description). This pocket-sized volume, “usefull for merchants and marriners” despite its diminutive size, is the first composed on an English model.
The atlas first appeared as the Book of Geography circa 1676, the maps designed as playing cards, each suit devoted to one of the continents; in this new edition the engraved annotations necessary for use as playing cards have been removed, changes have been made to the plates, and the volume recast as Atlas Minimus, or a Book of Geography, evidently as an educational volume, which seems to have been a more successful format. As with the example in the New York Public Library, but unlike the British Library copy, this copy was issued without text.
Thirteen of the maps relate to the Americas, including a map of North and South America, one of North America (The English Empire in America), New Mexico (the first English map to focus on New Mexico and the island of California), and Florida (the first English map of what is now the southern United States, from Florida to Texas). Also the Artick Pole is the term used to describe Greenland and Iceland, while Zaara is the archaic word used to identify the Sahara.
John Seller was an English instrument-maker, map-maker, chart-maker, publisher of the first sustained series of English maritime atlases, the instigator of a national survey of England and Wales, the publisher of our first celestial atlas, and writer on navigation and seller of maps, charts, and geographical books. From 1671 he held the position of Hydrographer to the King.

Returns Policy

You may return most new, unopened items within 30 days of delivery for a full refund. We'll also pay the return shipping costs if the return is a result of our error (you received an incorrect or defective item, etc.).

You should expect to receive your refund within four weeks of giving your package to the return shipper, however, in many cases you will receive a refund more quickly. This time period includes the transit time for us to receive your return from the shipper (5 to 10 business days), the time it takes us to process your return once we receive it (3 to 5 business days), and the time it takes your bank to process our refund request (5 to 10 business days).

If you need to return an item, simply login to your account, view the order using the 'Complete Orders' link under the My Account menu and click the Return Item(s) button. We'll notify you via e-mail of your refund once we've received and processed the returned item.

Shipping

We can ship to virtually any address in the world. Note that there are restrictions on some products, and some products cannot be shipped to international destinations.

When you place an order, we will estimate shipping and delivery dates for you based on the availability of your items and the shipping options you choose. Depending on the shipping provider you choose, shipping date estimates may appear on the shipping quotes page.

Please also note that the shipping rates for many items we sell are weight-based. The weight of any such item can be found on its detail page. To reflect the policies of the shipping companies we use, all weights will be rounded up to the next full pound.

Returns Policy

You may return most new, unopened items within 30 days of delivery for a full refund. We'll also pay the return shipping costs if the return is a result of our error (you received an incorrect or defective item, etc.).

You should expect to receive your refund within four weeks of giving your package to the return shipper, however, in many cases you will receive a refund more quickly. This time period includes the transit time for us to receive your return from the shipper (5 to 10 business days), the time it takes us to process your return once we receive it (3 to 5 business days), and the time it takes your bank to process our refund request (5 to 10 business days).

If you need to return an item, simply login to your account, view the order using the 'Complete Orders' link under the My Account menu and click the Return Item(s) button. We'll notify you via e-mail of your refund once we've received and processed the returned item.

Shipping

We can ship to virtually any address in the world. Note that there are restrictions on some products, and some products cannot be shipped to international destinations.

When you place an order, we will estimate shipping and delivery dates for you based on the availability of your items and the shipping options you choose. Depending on the shipping provider you choose, shipping date estimates may appear on the shipping quotes page.

Please also note that the shipping rates for many items we sell are weight-based. The weight of any such item can be found on its detail page. To reflect the policies of the shipping companies we use, all weights will be rounded up to the next full pound.

Recently Viewed Products Recently Viewed Products